Georg "Shifty Eyes" Hegel, portrait by Schlesinger (1831)

A Man of His Time, and Not

I read Roger Scruton’s brilliant short section on Hegel’s theory of being in Scruton’s Modern Philosophy: An Introduction and Survey (Allen Lane Penguin, 2004). Which led me back to a very challenging work by David Gray Carlson, A Commentary to Hegel’s Science of Logic (Palgrave MacMillan, 2007). Between Scruton’s worthy short analysis and Carlson’s ambitious…

Why does philosophy continue?

Why does philosophy “continue” when it can never seem to achieve final resolution of its problems? I’ve found that Heidegger offers the most compelling account for why philosophy continually returns to its source problems, whereas sciences seem to come to once-and-for-all conclusions. On Heidegger’s account, philosophy or Theory began when the Greeks explicitly articulated the…

The Mind-Body Problem

Is it like this? — The “I” of speech and thinking exists only in the rhetorical or social “space of reasons” (in Wilfrid Sellars’ phrase) between empirical bodies. Thus “I” need to refer to “my body” as an object here in this particular empirical spatial and temporal location when addressing you about a pain I…

Heidegger and the question of “being”

What is the radical or root point on which Heidegger’s philosophical relevance turns? It seems to me this: The history of Western philosophy, science, and technology, rooted in Greek thinking, have taught Western civilization always to think of “being” as some particular kind of “substance”. Substance traditionally refers to what ultimately underlies the appearance of…