Why does philosophy continue?

Why does philosophy “continue” when it can never seem to achieve final resolution of its problems? I’ve found that Heidegger offers the most compelling account for why philosophy continually returns to its source problems, whereas sciences seem to come to once-and-for-all conclusions. On Heidegger’s account, philosophy or Theory began when the Greeks explicitly articulated the…

Heidegger the neo-Aristotelian

Heidegger’s philosophy is often maligned as mystical or obfuscating. This is because of the great generality of the terms with which he is working, e.g., “being”, “world”, etc. But these terms are not found to be too general when we investigate them in a concrete phenomenological manner, i.e., from their origin in the primordial experience…

Heidegger and the question of “being”

What is the radical or root point on which Heidegger’s philosophical relevance turns? It seems to me this: The history of Western philosophy, science, and technology, rooted in Greek thinking, have taught Western civilization always to think of “being” as some particular kind of “substance”. Substance traditionally refers to what ultimately underlies the appearance of…

Meaning in Fact

Oughts and Thoughts: Scepticism and the Normativity of Meaning is a 2007 book by Oxford philosophy professor Anandi Hattiangadi that develops a response to Saul Kripke’s skepticism about whether there is a fact of meaning in a person’s use of language. In Kripke’s 1984 book Wittgenstein on Rules and Private Language he argued, via a…